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Tuesday, August 29

Saturday, June 3

  1. page Grimsley ACT and SAT Links and Words edited ... fiscal (adj) of or relating to government revenue, especially taxes empathy (noun) the abilit…
    ...
    fiscal (adj) of or relating to government revenue, especially taxes
    empathy (noun) the ability to understand the feelings of another
    ...
    excessively or ingratiatingly,ingratiatingly flattering; oily.
    delineate (v.) describe or portray (something) precisely.
    bombast (noun) high-sounding language with little meaning, used to impress people
    (view changes)
    8:06 am

Tuesday, May 16

  1. page How to Read...Professor edited Online Text/PDF {How to Read Literature Like a Professor.pdf} Writing Assignments for How t…

    Online Text/PDF
    {How to Read Literature Like a Professor.pdf}
    Writing Assignments for How to Read Literature Like a Professor to be completed during the school year using Summer Reading.
    by Thomas C. Foster
    (view changes)
    8:31 am
  2. page Summer Reading edited Summer Reading Assignment: {How to Read Literature Like a Professor.pdf} Using Richard Foster’s…
    Summer Reading Assignment:
    {How to Read Literature Like a Professor.pdf}
    Using Richard Foster’s How to Read Literature Like a Professor to develop your critical lens
    Read
    Read (optional) Thomas Foster’s
    Read The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo, OR The Road by Cormac McCarthy with a critical lens.
    a. Annotate. Foster’s book should help you figure out what to look for and how to do this. Focus on connections, important quotes, and a search for deeper meaning. This is part of the process of coming to your own interpretations and analyses.
    i. Don’t just jump right to Spark Notes, Schmoop, and Wikipedia. Once you’re tracked into their ideas and interpretations, it’s hard to get out of them and come up with your own; always try to figure it out on your own first.
    b. In your annotations you must make specific and obvious references back to Foster. You will be graded on this. Some students like to color code, others use acronyms, others use sticky tabs, others just write the name of the chapter. Find a system that works for you and that we will be able to grade.
    c. At a minimum, you need to show obvious references to, and application of, the following chapters in your annotations:
    i. “Every Trip Is a Quest
    ii. “Nice to Eat with You: Acts of Communion” (note, the inverse, eating alone, is significant too. . . . can you figure out what that means?
    iii. Point out several allusions from at least two of the following chapters: “Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before?”; “When in Doubt, It’s From Shakespeare . . . “; “. . . Or the Bible”; “Hanseldee and Greteldum”; and/or “It’s Greek to Me”
    iv. “It’s More Than Just Rain or Snow”
    v. “ . . . More Than It’s Gonna Hurt You: Concerning Violence”
    vi. “Is That a Symbol?”
    vii. “It’s All Political”
    viii. “It’s All About Sex . . . “ and/or “. . . Except Sex”
    ix. “Geography Matters . . .”
    x. “. . . So Does Season”
    xi. “He’s Blind for a Reason, You Know”; “It’s Never Just Heart Disease . . . “; and/or “. . . And Rarely Just Illness”
    xii. “Is He Serious? And Other Ironies”
    3.
    3. When you
    ...
    by Cormac McCarthyusingMcCarthy using specific quotes
    ...
    you chose.
    If you do this assignment well, the paper should be a piece of cake.
    Still not sure about this whole annotating thing? Here’s a brief guide:
    Annotating is simply thinking about and interacting with what you are reading. Good readers have multiple lines of thought going at once – a line of thought that is reading and enjoying the language and the plot, and a line that is thinking about and analyzing what he or she is reading. Just write some of that stuff down: fill the margins with what you are thinking, stars, questions, disagreements, underline quotes that seem important or thought provoking or simply sound good, etc.
    1. Have a purpose. Why are you reading this? What are you looking for? You might have multiple purposes and they may change as you read, but having a purpose will help you pay attention and be critical of what you read. For example,
    You might notice something about the author’s style and mark every time you see an example of certain usage, sentence structure, motifs, allusions or other style elements.
    You might have a hypothesis on a symbol or metaphor, so you underline and comment anywhere you see the symbol mentioned or areas that would support your argument.
    You might track a certain theme and its development throughout the piece of writing.
    You might think about prevalent literary elements you might analyze and find words and passages that create these elements.
    You might think about the historical context of the novel and the social critique it seems to be purporting.
    You might do several or all of these by the time you reach the end of the book (they’re long ones).
    2. Read everything –this seems redundant, but you will have a lot independent work in this course and you will need a positive work ethic. If you’re already skipping out on the reading, this may not be the right course.
    3. Mark it! – underline, write in the margins, etc.
    Circle, underline, or use a sticky note for important ideas and quotes.
    Mark repetitions. Mark repetitions. (Writers choose words for a living, if they choose the same word, phrase, imagery, description, etc. twice, it’s for a reason)
    Circle confusing words or phrases. Define from context or dictionary if possible.
    Note passages that generate a strong response, positive or negative.
    Write summaries of important or difficult passages.
    Make connections – to things you’ve learned in other courses, to personal experience, to other works of literature, etc.
    4. Confused? Write questions. Why does he keep talking about eyes? Why does he keep calling the elevator a metal box? Why such a preoccupation with people’s socks? Why is Bob so concerned about an injured bird? Why is Suzie never in the room as the same time as Bob?
    5. You don’t have to fill every inch of white space or comment on every single page. You might hit a page or section in which you have several underlines and comments, then hit a dozen pages with nothing, and that’s fine. When I grade annotations I just want to see that you read and interacted with the text. Quality is better than quantity, but as far as quantity, as long as it averages out to at least something every couple pages –sometimes underlining, sometimes commentary, sometimes both – you’re fine. Don’t forget your references to Foster should be clear enough for us to be able to flip through your book and find them on our own.

    Note: Your major works data sheet must be submitted to turnitin.com during the first week of school
    Title of Work:
    ...
    If using the internet for anything, please use it as a reference tool for literary terms, vocabulary, allusions, author bio, etc., not to look up or replace the book itself. This assignment must be done in your own words, based on your own reading, not based on other MWDS online.
    Your MWDS must be submitted to turnitin.com during the first week of school
    ThereExpect to write an essay which will be a major assessment (essay, test, or project) assigned during the first weekweeks of school.
    Here is a link to online literature. You will find many works of literature there.
    Online Literature
    ...
    to text as a suggested, not required, reading.
    (view changes)
    6:05 am

Wednesday, May 3

  1. page Their Eyes Were Watching God edited ... {TEWWG Activity Five.pdf} Limit Five 1. Nicholas Tauber 2, 3, ... {TEWWG Activity Nin…
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    {TEWWG Activity Five.pdf}
    Limit Five
    1. Nicholas Tauber
    2,
    3,
    ...
    {TEWWG Activity Nine.pdf}
    Limit Three Students
    1. Nicholas Tauber
    Limit Three Students
    1.
    (view changes)
    7:15 pm

Monday, May 1

  1. page Their Eyes Were Watching God edited ... 3. Ethan 4. Jasmine Greenwood 5. Juan Vigoya Five: Impact Essay ... 1. Richard Moore …
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    3. Ethan
    4. Jasmine Greenwood
    5. Juan Vigoya
    Five:
    Impact Essay
    ...
    1. Richard Moore
    2. Colleen Gundersen
    3. Juan Vigoya
    Six:
    Three Writing
    ...
    Limit Three
    1. Bonnie Froneberger
    ...
    Tess Garrison
    3.
    Nine:
    (view changes)
    4:42 pm

Saturday, April 29

  1. page Their Eyes Were Watching God edited ... Limit Three 1. Bonnie Froneberger 2, Tess Garrison 3. Nine:
    ...
    Limit Three
    1. Bonnie Froneberger
    2, Tess Garrison
    3.
    Nine:
    (view changes)
    1:10 pm

Wednesday, April 26

  1. page The Road edited {The Road and Dystopian Novels.docx}
    {The Road and Dystopian Novels.docx}
    (view changes)
    11:21 am

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