Theodore Roethke




CCSS
Writing
11-12W
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
Writing
11-12W
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
a. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

Speaking and Listening
11-12SL
Comprehension and Collaboration
1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

Language
11-12 L
Knowledge of Language
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Vocabulary Usage and Use
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Poetic Forms
Poetic Movements

Essential Questions:

How does the life of the learner synthesize with a poem to form a unique meaning?

What can we learn about an author, ourselves, and each other through poetry?

Process:

Students will place poetry study on this page and use the same information to teach the class about a specific poet.

Option One:

This is an out-of-class essay that you should work on throughout the poetry unit. This exercise is created to develop the ability to read poetry and to share that reading with others. From the poets represented in Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, choose one whose work you admire. Read a substantial number of his/her poems and using three or four representative poems in which you analyze the poet's characteristic themes and techniques. Emphasis should be on the poems. Do not focus on the poet's life. Length: 1,000-1,500 words. This is due in the month of February. You will be presenting your findings to the class in five minute time-frame. At that time you will be expected to give a BRIEF biography of the poet and present your analysis of one of his/her poems. Conclude by generalizing about the poet's style, themes, etc. Please post your typed assignment to the class wikipage.


Option Two:

This assignment is an open-ended approach to poetry through the creation of a unique video. This exercise is created to develop the ability make personal connections to poetry and to share that interpretation with others. From the poets represented in Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, choose one whose work you admire. Select one or more of his/her poems and create a video that connects the author’s personal history to the poem while sharing your own reason for selecting the poem. Make personal connections to the poet/poem and share your meaning in a video of 5-8 minutes.Evaluate the poet’s characteristic themes and techniques and synthesize with your own meaning. Please post your assignment to the class poetry wikipage.

Elements for Both:

Develop an AP prompt with one or two works from your poet. Create a scoring rubric with descriptive summaries by grading ranges.


Mandatory Elements:





Student Samples

Poetry Activity Link

Poetry Out Loud Link



"Still I Rise" by Maya Angelou


FEBRUARY 2014

Insert your name in the calendar. No more than two students per day.


February Poetry Portfolio

Choose from the suggestions below or select your own from Perrine's.

First Block

Indicate author and selection of product. Your video, if you the option, will be embedded below the table.
Remember, all students will create an AP Prompt with Rubric. will be provided.
Authors may not be duplicated. All author's must be in Perrine's but the poems do not have to be from the book.

Second Block

Indicate author and selection of product. Your video, if you choose the option, will be embedded below the table.
Remember, all students will create an AP Prompt with Rubric. Samples will be provided.
Authors may not be duplicated. All authors must be in Perrine's but the poems do not have to be from the book.